London websites

Likeable London links

Clickable banners for London-related websites and blogs you may find useful, interesting or plain delightful


Londonist
News, infor­ma­tion, previews, reviews, opinion and more. Hidden London confesses to having been sceptical about Londonist when it began, because it was an offshoot of the NYC-based Gothamist rather than a home-grown creation. But after more than a decade of fine work and fine-tuning it now qualifies as a fully fledged London insti­tu­tion.
My London Walks
Immensely infor­ma­tive self-guided walks around the most inter­esting parts of London, with lots of illus­tra­tions and tailor-made maps. This is a new website that started with just ten walks – but it’s growing steadily, with an addi­tional walk published at least once a month.
The largest and most compre­hen­sive survey of parks and gardens in the capital, this is the online presence of the London Parks & Gardens Trust’s Inventory of Historic Green Spaces, containing over 2,500 impres­sively researched entries.
Diamond Geezer
“Life viewed from London E3”. Probably London’s best indi­vid­u­ally written blog – and certainly the most infor­ma­tive (but maybe not for those with a short attention span). DG also ventures beyond the London border increas­ingly often.
On London
On London is run and mostly written by Dave Hill, formerly the Guardian’s London commen­tator. “It seeks to report and explain how this extra­or­di­nary and complex city is changing in these momentous times.”
The Great Wen
The work of jour­nalist Peter Watts, the Great Wen may not be the most stylish-looking or frequently updated London blog but it’s one of the more infor­ma­tive and well written, covering a wide range of subjects, often of a cultural nature. The blog’s name, by the way, is a reference to William Cobbett’s famously caustic nickname for the city.
London Remembers
London Remembers documents over 5,000 commem­o­ra­tive plaques, monuments, statues and fountains.
London Historians blog
Updated regularly (though less often than it used to be) the London Histo­rians blog should satisfy even the most voracious appetite for musings and miscel­lania about London.
A celebration of Modernist architecture in Britain
Exquis­itely crafted profiles of 30 of the greatest Modernist buildings in London – and another 30 beyond. You’ll wish there were more. (And they’re coming … but slowly.)
Locating London's Past
Locating London’s Past allows you to search digital resources relating to early modern and 18th-century London, and to map the results on to John Rocque’s 1746 map – but it’s not for the tech­no­log­i­cally faint-hearted.
London Small Historic Houses
A baker’s dozen of small historic houses that tell the stories of fasci­nating and famous former residents.
Time Out
The category killer in the ‘what’s on in London’ market.
Visit London
The soulless website of “the official promo­tional company for London”. If you’re a complete London novice you may also be inter­ested in this one-page Guide to Visiting, Expe­ri­encing & Enjoying London.
TFL
Almost every­thing you need to know about trav­el­ling in London, with some useful journey planning tools.
London Town
Good commer­cial site for making arrange­ments for a visit – even long­standing Londoners can benefit from the expertise and infor­ma­tion arrayed here.
Evening Standard
London’s weekday newspaper. It could be better; could be worse.
London government
Don’t be put off by the anodyne masthead. This is City Hall’s reader-friendly site about almost every aspect of life in London, going far beyond what you might expect from the mayor and the London Assembly.
Edith's Streets
Wonder­fully detailed notes on London’s local history.
Randomness Guide to London
Another site that’s better than its masthead makes it look, the Random­ness Guide to London is “a kind of database, kind of review site, used for docu­menting inter­esting places in London”. It’s collab­o­ra­tive and commer­cial-free.
This is Local London
An aggregate site for news from around 40 of London’s local papers.
The Underground Map
Now a veritable compendium (of varying quality), the Under­ground Map goes way beyond the remit implied by its name, with enlight­ening material on all sorts of districts and struc­tures – and some excellent visual content, notably its “maps of this place through time” feature.