temp Pronunciation

Pronunciation guide

How to pronounce selected London place and street names – work in progress on a new version of the page

Hidden London: London stock brick wall with Plaahstoh sign

The correct pronun­ci­a­tions of some London place names are totally unguess­able. For example, outsiders can’t reason­ably be expected to know how to pronounce ‘Southwark’ or ‘Beauchamp Place’ or those Thames islets called ‘eyots’.

Even official sources make mistakes. When they were first intro­duced, the recorded announce­ments on the tube got east London’s Plaistow wrong. A chorus of cockney complaints prompted London Under­ground to implement a swift correc­tion.

Some pronun­ci­a­tions that are obvious to Brits can be baffling to everyone else. The American writer Jean Hannah Edelstein has blogged about her time as a London resident: “The first place I lived was Great Dover Street, an LSE hall of residence in Borough, which was pronounced ‘burra’, which I only learned when I got to the tube stop and heard it announced. Which I couldn’t quite believe.”

Certain well-known London addresses can be famously difficult for foreign visitors to artic­u­late properly. Leicester and Grosvenor Squares are classic instances. And this author has eastern European friends who speak excellent English yet are incapable of saying ‘Thames’ right.

In the past, more place names had quirky pronun­ci­a­tions than is the case today – and the list below mentions several ‘lost’ vari­a­tions. Nowadays, many London local­i­ties have rela­tively transient popu­la­tions and newcomers often simply pronounce place names as they’re written. Only when a peculiar pronun­ci­a­tion is deeply entrenched is it likely to survive.

The suggested pronun­ci­a­tions are for standard London English rather than hardcore cockney (in which, for example, Rother­hithe becomes ‘Rovverive’), but a few cockney vari­a­tions are mentioned where they are partic­u­larly char­ac­ter­istic.

Finally, it’s worth bearing in mind that Londoners were pioneers of the non-rhotic accent – in which, for example, words like ‘balmy’ and ‘barmy’ are pronounced the same. The ‘r’ is therefore not heard at all in place names like Clerken­well, Deptford and many more.

Please make contact if you’d like to suggest a place name that should be added to this guide.


For each entry in the list below there’s a ‘play’ icon for the audio clip, followed by a simplified pronunciation and then a transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet. There’s a key to the phonetic symbols used here at the bottom of this article.
In the simplified pronunciations, stressed syllables are capitalised.
In both the simplified and phonetic versions a parenthetical character indicates one that is optionally or barely articulated and a rotated ‘e’ (ə) indicates the indeterminate vowel sound known as a schwa.

Agar Town

AY-gah town or AY-gə town
ˈeɪɡɑ: taʊn or ˈeɪɡə taʊn

This locality north of King’s Cross was named after the eccentric and miserly William Agar (1767–1838).

Aldersgate

ALL-dəz-gate
ˈɔːldəzɡeɪt

The name is a corrup­tion of ‘Ealdrēd’s gate’ and probably dates from the late Saxon period.

Aldwych

ALL-dwitch
ˈɔːldwɪtʃ

Unlike Dulwich, Greenwich, etc., the ‘w’ is pronounced.

Anerley

AN-ə-lee
ˈænəlɪ

Rhymes with ‘mannerly’ – see Edward Lear’s limerick.

Aperfield

AP-ə-feeld
ˈæpəˌfiːld

This locality in Biggin Hill was formerly an ‘apple (tree) field’.

Arnos Grove

AH-noss grove
ˈɑːnɒs ɡrəʊv

‘Arnos’ is pronounced as though it never had an apos­trophe – but it did.

Beauchamp Place

BEE‑chəm place
ˈbiːtʃəm pleɪs

This is a classic example of the British tendency to strip out any ‘foreign­ness’ from the pronun­ci­a­tion of its aris­to­cratic titles, such as Viscount Beauchamp, and from the places, streets and houses named after them. The most notable exception to this rule in London is De Beauvoir Town (see below).

Becontree

BECK-ən-tree
ˈbɛkəntriː

Hidden London reluc­tantly accepts that some residents prefer to pronounce it BEE‑kən‑tree.

Belgravia

bel-GRAY-vee‑ə
bɛlˈɡreɪvɪə

The Marquess of West­min­ster, who created this district, also held the title Viscount Belgrave (from a hamlet on his Cheshire estate) – hence the name of the central square and by extension the name Belgravia.

Berkeley Square

BAHK-lee square
ˈbɑːklɪ skwɛə

Here’s a link to Frank Sinatra pronouncing ‘Berkeley’ perfectly (but ‘nightin­gale’ strangely).

Bermondsey

BER-mən-(d)zee
ˈbɜːmən(d)zɪ

Nowadays pronounced as it looks but in the Middle Ages it was pronounced (and sometimes even spelt) ‘Barmesey’.

Bevis Marks

BEV-iss mahx
ˈbɛvɪs mɑːks

This short City street used to be ‘Buries marks’ but some medieval scribe copied the name wrongly and the mistake stuck.

Borough

BURR‑ə
ˈbʌrə

The above guidance applies to the locality in Southwark and all other London usage of ‘borough’ as a separate word. When it is appended as part of a longer place name, such as Farn­bor­ough or South­bor­ough it is pronounced ‑bərə or ‑brə.

Bow

boh
bəʊ

Rhymes with ‘go’, and the same applies to Covent Garden’s Bow Street and the City church of St Mary-le-Bow.

Bowes Park

boze pahk
bəʊz pɑːk

This place name seems to be indi­rectly related to the ‘bow and arrow’ sense of the word ‘bow’.

Brentham

BREN-təm
ˈbrɛntəm

The name was invented at the beginning of the 20th century for this new settle­ment near the River Brent.

Brondesbury

BRON(D)Z‑b(ə)ry
ˈbrɒn(d)zb(ə)rɪ

The History of the County of Middlesex says, not entirely intel­li­gibly, “The manor or prebend of Bron­des­bury, Brands, or Brooms­bury almost certainly derived its name from Brand (c.1192–1215), listed as prebendary of Brownswood in Hornsey, evidently in confusion with Roger Brun (c.1154), from whom Brownswood presum­ably took its name, listed as prebendary of Bron­des­bury.”

Buckingham Palace

BUCK-ing-əm palace
ˈbʌkɪŋəm ˈpælɪs

Like almost every place name ending in ‘ham’ (and London has dozens of them), the ‘h’ is silent in British English.

Cadogan Gate, Lane, Place, Square, etc.

kə-DUG-ən
kəˈdʌɡən

The Cadogan family, who still own much of the land south of Knights­bridge, derive their name from the Welsh cad ‘battle’ and gwogawn ‘glory’.

Carshalton

cah‑SHAWL‑tən
kɑːˈʃɔːltən

Formerly case-HOR-tən (appar­ently).

Castelnau

KAH‑s(ə)l‑nau
ˈkɑːs(ə)lnɔː

Usually pronounced as in ‘neither castle nor city’ but minori­ties prefer a couple of French-influ­enced vari­a­tions.

Cheam

cheem
tʃiːm

Now pronounced mono­syl­lab­i­cally, this was Ceiham in 1086 and Chayham in 1226, probably from words meaning ‘homestead by the tree stumps’.

Chessington

CHESS-ing-tən
ˈtʃɛsɪŋtən

Some locals prefer CHEZZ-ing-tən.

Cheyne Row, Gardens, Walk, etc.

CHAY-nee
ˈtʃeɪnɪ

Derived from William Cheyne, 2nd Viscount Newhaven.

Chiswick

CHIZ-ik
ˈtʃɪzɪk

Rhymes with ‘physic’.

Chiswick Eyot

CHIZ-ik ait
ˈtʃɪzɪk eɪt

The words ‘eyot’ and ‘ait’ are used inter­change­ably to denote the small islands of the Thames and the two are pronounced iden­ti­cally, as in ‘eight’. (‘Eyot’ can also be pronounced ‘ite’ but this makes an already confusing situation even worse.)

Clapham

CLAP-əm
ˈklæpəm

The name was first recorded c.880 as Cloppaham.

Clerkenwell

CLAHK-ən-well
ˈklɑːkənwɛl

First recorded in Latin (c.1145) as fons cleri­corum, the clerics’ well.

Cockfosters

COCK-foss-təz
ˈkɒkfɒstəz

Pronounced exactly as it looks – unlike, say, Cockburn’s port (which is pronounced Co’burns).

Colney Hatch

KOH-nee hatch
ˈkəʊnɪ hætʃ

The family who gave their name to this place by a hatch (gate, perhaps into Hollick Wood) may have come from Colney in Hert­ford­shire, which takes its name from the River Colne and is usually pronounced without an ‘l’ sound.

Conduit Street

CON-dwit street
ˈkɒndwɪt striːt

Aris­to­crats say CUN-dit but ordinary people say CON-dwit or CON-dew-it.

Coulsdon

COOLZ-dən
ˈkuːlzdən

Purists insist it should be pronounced COALZ‑dən.

Covent Garden

COV-ənt GAR‑d(ə)n or CUV‑ənt GAR‑d(ə)n
ˈkɒvənt ˈɡɑːd(ə)n or ˈkʌvənt ˈɡɑːd(ə)n

It’s posher but less correct (Hidden London believes) to pronounce ‘Covent’ as in ‘coven’ or ‘covenant’.

Cubitt Town

KEW-bit town
ˈkjuːbɪt taʊn

This town was built on the Isle of Dogs in the 1840s by William Cubitt.

Cudham

KUD-əm
ˈkʌdəm

‘The homestead or enclosure of a man called Cuda’.

Dagenham

DAG-(ə)n‑əm
ˈdæɡ(ə)nəm

As in similar place names, such as Tottenham, cockneys barely vocalise the middle vowel at all.

Dalston

DAWL-stən
ˈdɔːlstən

The emphasis on the imaginary ‘w’ increases with one’s cock­ney­ness.

De Beauvoir

də BOH-vwar
də ˈbəʊvwɑːr

Pronounced ‘Də Beevə’ by purists but in Anglo-French style by almost all locals.

Deptford

DE℗T‑fəd
ˈdɛ℗tfəd

Strictly, there should be no ‘p’ sound at all, but it has for some while been creeping back in because of the trend towards pronouncing place names as they are spelt.

Dulwich

DULL-itch
ˈdʌlɪtʃ

Unlike other London ‑wiches, Dulwich was not orig­i­nally a wīc (specialised farm or trading settle­ment or harbour); it was a wisc (meadow), where dill grew.

Eastcote

EAST-coat
ˈiːsts-koʊt

Alter­na­tively EAST-kət.

Eltham

EL-təm
ˈɛltəm

The name is probably related to a man called Elta but possibly to one or more swans (elfitu).

Erith

EAR-ith
ˈɪərɪθ

It’s sometimes pronounced ‘Errith’ but this is wrong, in Hidden London’s opinion (and Wendy Cope’s).

Euston

YOO-stən
ˈjuːstən

The name was trans­ferred from Euston Hall in Suffolk, country seat of the dukes of Grafton.

Feltham

FEL-təm
ˈfɛltəm

Feltham probably began as a “homestead or enclosure where mullein or a similar plant grows,” according to David Mills.

Fitzrovia

fits-RO-veea
fɪtsˈrəʊvɪə

A name that seems to have been invented in the 1920s (see Hidden London’s article on Fitzrovia).

Friern Barnet

FRY-ən BAH-nit
ˈfraɪən ˈbɑːnɪt

‘Friern’ is usually pronounced as in ‘friar’, but some locals prefer FREE‑ən.

Fulham

FULL-əm
ˈfʊləm

The name was first recorded c.705 as Fulanham.

Gidea Park

GID-ee‑ə pahk
ˈgɪdɪə pɑːk

Gidiehall was first recorded in 1258 and Guydie hall park was first mentioned in 1668. The name came from the Middle English gidi (giddy), so the hall may have had a wacky appear­ance – or its inhab­i­tants might have been somewhat skittish.

Gloucester Road, Place, Square, Terrace, etc.

GLOSS-tə
ˈɡlɒstə

In most of its London appear­ances the ‘Gloucester’ name derives from one of the dukes of Gloucester, usually William Henry (e.g. Gloucester Place) or William Frederick (e.g. Gloucester Gate). Gloucester Road indi­rectly takes its name from William Henry’s widow, Maria, Duchess of Gloucester.

Goodge Street

[see note]
guːdʒ striːt or ɡʊdʒ striːt

‘Goodge’ is usually pronounced to rhyme with ‘Scrooge’ – but some opt for a shorter (near-close) ‘oo’ sound, as in ‘good’.

Gower Street

GOW‑ə street
ˈɡaʊə striːt

‘Gower’ is pronounced to rhyme with ‘power’.

Greenwich

GRIN-idge or GREN-itch
ˈɡrɪnɪdʒ or ˈɡrɛnɪtʃ

… or some blend of the two, as long as it’s never ‘green’ and never ‘wich’.

Hidden London: Greenwich spinach

Grosvenor Square, Street, Hill, etc.

GRO‑v(ə)nə
ˈgrəʊv(ə)nə

The names come from the Grosvenor family of Eaton Hall, Cheshire, owners and devel­opers of the land in Mayfair, and in Belgravia too.

Hainault

HAY-nawlt or HAY-nolt
ˈheɪnɔːlt or ˈheɪnəʊlt

The name is a ficti­tiously Frenchi­fied form of the Old English higna holt – meaning a ‘wood belonging to a monastic community’ – but it’s pronounced without any French influence.

Harmondsworth

HAHM-əndz-wəth
ˈhɑːməndzwəθ

Formerly often pronounced without the middle syllable (HAHMZ‑wəth) but nowadays rendered pretty much as it looks.

Havering-atte-Bower

HAY‑v(ə)ring AT‑tee bowr
ˈheɪv(ə)rɪŋ ˌætɪ ˌbaʊə

Haverstock Hill

HAV-ə-stok hill
ˈhævəstɒk hɪl

Heneage Lane

HEN-idge lane
ˈhɛnɪdʒ leɪn

Holborn

HO-bən
ˈhəʊbən

Some Londoners artic­u­late the ‘l’, but Hidden London disap­proves. Dropping (or half-dropping) the ‘l’ when it appears between a vowel and a consonant (and at the end of certain words) was once a common trait of working-class London speech. Words like ‘milk’ or ‘bulb’ were tradi­tion­ally pronounced with something like a ‘w’ sound in place of the ‘l’. There’s evidence that something similar was happening with ‘Holborn’ at least as early as the mid-16th century. With most words this verbal foible didn’t become the accepted norm across all London classes – but with ‘Holborn’ it did, though in a slightly posher form.

Homerton

HOM-ə-tən
ˈhɒmətən

Orig­i­nally the ‘farmstead or estate of a woman called Hūnburh’ this place was first recorded in 1343, when it was spelt Humberton.

Hounslow

HOWNZ-loh
ˈhaʊnzləʊ

First recorded in Domesday Book, this place may have been either the ‘mound of the hound’ or (less amusingly) ‘tumulus of a man called Hund’.

Isleworth

EYE‑z(ə)l‑wəth
ˈaɪz(ə)lwəθ

Islington

IZ-ling-tən
ˈɪzlɪŋtən

Jermyn Street

JER-min street
ˈdʒɜːmɪn striːt

There is also a ‘German’ school of thought (i.e. JER-mən) while tiny minori­ties advocate jer-MAIN and JAR-mən.

Lamorbey

LAM-ə-bee
ˈlæməbɪ

Lansbury

LANZ‑b(ə)-ree
ˈlænzb(ə)rɪ

Americans may pronounce Angela Lansbury’s surname something like LANZ-beh-ree but it takes a more contracted form in London English – and the same applies to this estate in Poplar, which is named after her grand­fa­ther.

Leadenhall

LED-(ə)n‑haul
ˈlɛd(ə)nˌhɔːl

Leamouth

LEE-məth
ˈliːməθ

Like almost all British place names ending in ‘mouth’, the second syllable is pronounced with the inde­ter­mi­nate vowel sound.

Leicester Square, Street, Place, Court, etc.

LESS-tə
ˈlɛstə

Leighton House

LAY-tən house
ˈleɪtən haʊs

Leman Street

LEE-mən street
ˈliːmən striːt

Many locals prefer LEM-ən, as in ‘lemon’.

Lewisham

LOO-ish-əm
ˈluːɪʃəm

Formerly LOO-iss-(h)əm.

Leyton

LAY-tən
ˈleɪtən

Leytonstone

LAY-tən-stone
ˈleɪtənˌstoʊn

Hidden London doesn’t object to the alter­na­tive ending ‘‑stən’ instead of ‘‑stone’, but some people do.

London

LUN-dən
ˈlʌndən

Cockneys pronounce it more like LAHN-dən (formerly sometimes LUN-ən).

Loughton

LOW-tən (LOW to rhyme with COW)
ˈlaʊtən

Loughton isn’t in London but it’s on the London Under­ground.

Maida Hill and Maida Vale

MAID‑ə hill and MAID‑ə vale
ˈmeɪdə hɪl and ˈmeɪdə veɪl

Although these local­i­ties indi­rectly take their names from Maida in Calabria, there is no hint of Italian in their London pronun­ci­a­tion, which is simply as in ‘made a hill and made a vale’.

Marylebone

MA-ree-li-bən (Marrylibun) or MAH-lee-bən
ˈmærɪlɪbən or ˈmɑːlɪbən

Some author­i­ties do not recognise the ‘Marrylibun’ pronun­ci­a­tion but Hidden London finds this baffling as it’s the one most people use.

Millwall

MILL-wall
ˈmɪlwɔːl

Pronounced exactly as it looks – but serious cockneys tend to put more emphasis on the second syllable than might be expected, as well as pronouncing each ‘ll’ as a semivowel (something like a ‘w’ sound).

Minories

MIN-ər-iz
ˈmɪnərɪz

This City street is named from a former nunnery (1294–1538), the abbey of the Minoresses of St Clare. It’s typical of Londoners to have thought, “‘Minoresses’ is a bit of a mouthful, so I’ll just say ‘Minories’”.

Northolt

NORTH-olt
ˈnɔːʳθəʊlt

Nower Hill

NOH‑ə hill
ˈnəʊə hɪl

‘Nower’ is pronounced to rhyme with ‘slower’.

Osidge

OSS-idge
ˈɒsɪdʒ

Hidden London: Osidge sausage

Pall Mall

PAL mal
ˈpæl ˌmæl

Nowadays pronounced as in ‘pallet’ and ‘mallet’.

Petrie Museum

PEE-tree museum
ˈpiːtrɪ mjuːˈzɪəm

Some say otherwise but Hidden London believes ‘Petrie’ should be pronounced as in ‘peach tree’ (but without the ‘ch’).

Penge

penj
pɛndʒ

The only purely Celtic place name in London.

Pield Heath

peeld heath
piːld hiːθ

This 16th-century name indicates a piece of heathland that had been stripped (peeled) bare of vege­ta­tion.

Plaistow (Newham)

PLAH-stoh (or an even more elongated PLAAH-stoh)
ˈplɑːstəʊ

In certain words, cockneys used to lengthen the ‘a’ sound where most other Londoners wouldn’t. (Some aris­to­crats also did, in a slightly more refined way.) For example, ‘drastic’ would be pronounced ‘drahstic’. From at least the 16th century Plaistow was conven­tion­ally pronounced ‘Plasstoh’ but when this Essex village became a solidly working-class London suburb in the second half of the 19th century its new residents pronounced the first syllable as in the southern English way of saying ‘plaster’. And now every self-respecting Londoner does the same.

NB   There is also a Plaistow in Bromley, which is much less well-known and is usually pronounced ‘Playstoh’.

Platt’s Eyot

plats ait
plæts eɪt

See the note on Chiswick Eyot, above.

Rotherhithe

[see note]
ˈrɒðəhaɪð

‘Rother’ is pronounced to rhyme with ‘bother’ and ‘hithe’ to rhyme with ‘scythe’. It used to be pronounced (and sometimes written) ‘Redriff’.

Ruislip

RICE-lip
ˈraɪslɪp

St Helier

sənt HELL-ee‑ə
sənt ˈhɛlɪə

This estate on the Merton/Sutton border was named in honour of Lady St Helier.

St Martin’s‑le-Grand

sənt MAH-tinz lə GRAND
sənt ˈmɑːtɪnz lə ˌɡrænd

Pronounced English style, with no French influence.

St Pancras

sənt PANK-rəss
sənt ˈpæŋkrəs

Usage of the mala­propism ‘St Pancreas’ is a sure sign of a newcomer to London or an overzealous spellchecker.

Savile Row

SAV-əll row
ˈsævəl rəʊ

Some say SAV-ill but Hidden London prefers the rhyme with ‘gavel’.

Smitham

[see note]
ˈsmɪðəm

Rhymes with ‘rhythm’.

Somers Town

[see note]
ˈsʌməz taʊn

Pronounced the same as Wandsworth’s Summer­stown.

Southall

SOUTH-all
ˈsaʊθɔːl

Unlike Southwark (below) this place name is pronounced as it looks.

Southwark

[see note]
ˈsʌðək

Pronounced like ‘southern’ except that it ends with a ‘k’ not an ‘n’.

Spitalfields

SPIT-əl-feeldz
ˈspɪtəlfiːldz

Once you know that this place was orig­i­nally the ‘hospital fields’, it should be easy to pronounce it.

Streatham

STRET-əm
ˈstrɛtəm

It has probably been pronounced the same way since the Middle Ages.

Stroud Green

strowd green
straʊd ɡriːn

‘Stroud’ rhymes with ‘cloud’ not ‘clued’.

Surrey Quays

SURR-ee keys
ˈsʌrɪ kiːz

A neologism for Surrey Docks. The old name seems to have carried too many working-class conno­ta­tions.

Thames

temz
tɛmz

The name may derive from a Celtic root word meaning ‘dark’. Julius Caesar referred to the river as ‘Tamesis’ in 51BC.

Theobalds Road

THE-ə-bauldz road [‘the-’ as in ‘theory’]
ˈθɪəbɔːldz rəʊd

TIB-auldz is (or was) strictly correct – as in the nearby Tybalds estate – but nowadays everyone pronounces it as it looks.

Theydon Bois

THAY-dən boyz or boyce
ˈθeɪdən bɔɪz or bɔɪs

Theydon Bois isn’t in London but it’s on the London Under­ground.

Tokyngton

TOKE-ing-tən
ˈtəʊkɪŋtən

Tokyngton is a corner of Wembley possessing remark­able ethnic diversity.

Tottenham

TOT-(ə)n‑əm
ˈtɒt(ə)nəm

The same pronun­ci­a­tion applies to Tottenham Court Road, although the names of the district and the street possess only an inci­dental etymo­log­ical connec­tion.

Twickenham

TWIK-(ə)n‑əm
ˈtwɪk(ə)nəm

This place name was first recorded in 704 as Tuicanhom.

Vauxhall

VOX-hall
ˈvɒksˌhɔːl

Londoners’ artic­u­la­tion of the ‘h’ ranges from distinct to nonex­is­tent.

Walthamstow

WAWL‑thəm‑stoh
ˈwɔːlθəmstəʊ

The ‘tham’ in Waltham­stow and the London Borough of Waltham Forest is pronounced as it is in ‘Gotham’, unlike almost every other London place name containing that group of letters, from Brentham to Thames­mead, where the ‘h’ is ignored.

Wanstead

WONN-stid
ˈwɒnstɪd

The name may have meant ‘white house’ or ‘place by the wen-shaped hill’ or ‘place where wagons are kept’. We’ll almost certainly never know which.

Warwick Avenue

WORR-ick AV‑in‑yu
ˈwɒrɪk ˈævɪˌnjuː

Named after Jane Warwick, of Warwick Hall, Warwick-on-Eden.

Wapping

WOP-ing
ˈwɒpɪŋ

Rhymes with ‘topping’.

Whetstone

WET-stone
ˈwɛtˌstəʊn

HWET-stone is by no means unac­cept­able but it’s very rarely heard.

Wimbledon

WIM-bəl-dən
ˈwɪmbəldən

What was Wune­mannedune around 950 had evolved into Wimbeldon [sic] by 1211.

Woolwich

WOOL-idge or WOOL-itch
ˈwʊlɪdʒ or ˈwʊlɪtʃ

In 918 this place was spelt Uuluuich.

Yeading

YED-ing
ˈjɛdɪŋ

Rhymes with ‘bedding’.

Yiewsley

YOU-zlee
ˈjuːzlɪ

Orig­i­nally something like ‘Wifel’s Lea’.

Hidden London: Yiewsley muesli

Much of the etymo­log­ical infor­ma­tion on this page is drawn from the excellent Dictio­nary of London Place Names by AD Mills.
See also: Typical features of cockney speech at Wikipedia.

IPA phonetic key


Character(s)Sample words
ˈ(stress mark)
Conso­nants
ppen, copy, happen
bback, baby, job
ttea, tight, button
dday, ladder, odd
kkey, clock, school
gget, giggle, ghost
church, match, nature
judge, age, soldier
ffat, coffee, rough, photo
vview, heavy, move
θthing, author, path
ðthis, other, smooth
ssoon, cease, sister
zzero, music, roses, buzz
ʃship, sure, national
ʒpleasure, vision
hhot, whole, ahead
mmore, hammer, sum
nnice, know, funny, sun
ŋring, anger, thanks, sung
llight, valley, feel
rright, wrong, sorry, arrange
jyet, use, beauty, few
wwet, one, when, queen
Vowels
ɪkit, bid, hymn, minute
ɛdress, bed, head, many
ætrap, bad
ɒlot, odd, wash
ʌstrut, mud, love, blood
ʊfoot, good, put
fleece, sea, machine
face, day, break
price, high, try
ɔɪchoice, boy
goose, two, blue, group
əʊgoat, show, no
mouth, now
ɪənear, here, weary
ɛəsquare, fair, various
ɑːstart, father
ɔːthought, law, north, war
ʊəpoor, jury, cure
ɜːnurse, stir, learn, refer
əabout, common, standard
ihappy, radiate, glorious
uyou, influence, situation